10 Ways We Know Jesus Was a Bicycle Racer

1.  Jesus had a low Body Fat Percentage (BF%).

Muscle definition clearly shows low BF%<10%

Muscle definition clearly shows low BF%<10%, the limit for most pro cyclists.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2.  Jesus put the “Cross” in “Cyclocross.”

Early photo of Jesus running  the cross up a hill

Early photo of Jesus running the cross up a hill

Modern Cyclocross Run-up. (Courtesy CX Magazine)

Modern Cyclocross Run-up. (Courtesy CX Magazine)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3. Jesus shaved his legs. Most historians agree that lack of hair on legs prevented road rash in case of a crash (see # 4), and it improved aerodynamics.

jesus-legs

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4.  His wounds were likely from a bicycle race crash. Typical crash injuries include broken scapula/ collar bone, road rash, punctures from bicycle parts.

Note that his disciples introduced the use of cycling gloves, mainly to prevent injuries to hands in case of a crash

Note that his disciples introduced the use of cycling gloves, mainly to prevent injuries to hands in case of a crash

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5.  He wore a helmet.

Early helmets were often made of  circular bands of lightweight balsa wood and Roman leather.

Early helmets were often made of circular bands lightweight balsa wood and italian leather.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

6.  He popularized the “victory salute”

Victory Salute, circa 0 AD

Victory Salute, circa 0 AD

Victory Salute, circa 2014.

Victory Salute, circa 2014.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

7.  He is shown cycling here in an early, undated photo.

He was later relegated in this race for not wearing approved head protection.

He was later relegated in this race for not wearing approved head protection.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

8.  He loved climbing and hills, like any elite cyclist. See “Sermon on the Mount” and “Mount of Transfiguration” for details.

Historians estimate the grade of the Mount de Sermon at between 9% and 10%, at least 10% steeper than Mount Ventoux, of Tour de France lore.

Historians estimate the grade of the Mount de Sermon at between 9% and 10%, greater than the 7.6% of Mount Ventoux in today’s of Tour de France.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

9.  He used energy bars and gels. Nutritionists and sports historians widely agree that frankincense and myrrh were both early forms of performance enhancements.

Frankincense and myrrh, two of cycling’s earliest energy foods. The gold, top right, was accepted as currency at most early bicycle shops.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

10. We are pretty sure he wasn’t into running.

James 4:7: “Submit yourselves therefore to God. Resist Satan, as he runs marathons and trains for the biking part of triathlons by going to spin class.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Please note that no Christians, Jews for Jesus, or biblical figures alive or dead were harmed in the writing of this essay.

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